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Lesson Transcript

Hello and welcome to Indonesian Survival Phrases, brought to you by IndonesianPod101.com This course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Indonesia. You'll be surprised at how far a little Indonesian will go. Now before we jump in, remember to stop by IndonesianPod101.com. And there you’ll find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment.
Indonesian Survival Phrases Lesson 13. Restaurant Part 1
Today we'll cover getting by at the table. First you may have to get a hold of the staff. You can accomplish this by saying Permisi which means "excuse me." (slow) Permisi. Let’s break it down by syllable. Per-mi-si . Now let’s hear it once again. Permisi .
Once at the waiter or waitress comes to your table, you can go with the standard point and "This please."
In Indonesian "This please." is Boleh minta ini?
Let’s break it down by syllable. Bo-leh min-ta i-ni?
Now let’s hear it once again. Boleh minta ini?
The first word boleh means "may" or “be permitted to.”
Let's break down this word and hear it one more time. bo-leh. boleh.
This is followed by minta, which in Indonesian is "to ask for." (slow) minta. minta.
The last word is ini, which means "this."
Let's break down this word and hear it one more time. i-ni. ini.
Now let’s hear the entire expression again. Boleh minta ini?
Now if you're feeling ambitious, you could go for "What do you recommend?" or more naturally for Indonesian, "What's the most delicious thing?"
In Indonesian "What's the most delicious thing?" is Yang mana yang paling enak? (slow) Yang mana yang paling enak? Let’s break it down by syllable. Yang ma-na yang pa-ling e-nak? Now let’s hear it once again. Yang mana yang paling enak?
The first word yang mana means "which one." Let's break down this word and hear it one more time. Yang ma-na. Yang mana.
This is followed by yang, which means "the one that." (slow) yang. yang.
This is followed by paling, which in Indonesian is "most." paling. (slow) paling. paling.
The last word is enak, which means "delicious" or "pleasant."
Let's break down this word and hear it one more time. e-nak. enak.
Now let’s hear the entire expression again. Yang mana yang paling enak? Literally, this means "Which is the most delicious?"
Now here are more phrases that will come in handy-they have to do with water and ice!
In Indonesia the local tap water isn't safe to drink-at all. If you need some water, order some bottled water by asking Boleh minta air minum? (slow) Boleh minta air minum?. Let’s break it down by syllable. Bo-leh min-ta a-ir mi-num? Now let’s hear it once again. Boleh minta air minum?
We already know the first two words, which are boleh, which means "may" or "to be permitted"; boleh and minta, which means "to request" or "ask for something." minta. This is followed by air, which in Indonesian is "water." air. a-ir. air. The last word is minum, which means "to drink." Let's break down this word and hear it one more time. mi-num. minum.
Now let’s hear the entire expression again. Boleh minta air minum? Literally, this means "May I ask for some drinking water?"
Now on to the ice issue! Whether it is a health concern or economic decision, in Indonesian "No ice please." is Jangan pakai es! (slow) Jangan pakai es! Let’s break it down by syllable. Ja-ngan pa-kai es! Now let’ hear it once again. Jangan pakai es!
The first word jangan means "don't."
Let's break down this word and hear it one more time. Ja-ngan. Jangan.
This is followed by pakai, which in Indonesian is "to use." pa-kai. pakai.
The last word is es, which means "ice."
Let's break down this word and hear it one more time. es. es.
Now let’s hear the entire expression again. Jangan pakai es!
After all this talk about restaurant service I’ve got something to tell you that might shock you at first. In many small restaurants in Indonesia, the servers don’t even take your order. You have to write down the order yourselves, give that to the server and then he or she will bring your food once it’s ready. How do you know when you’ve enter the place like this? Well, the big clue’s that the menu will already be set at each table accompanied by few pens and restaurant pad, where you list down your items and quantities for each items.
Anyway in Indonesia is not customary to tip. But if you personally feel that the service was exceptional, you can give your server a token amount. If he or she really feels uncomfortable about it, you can donate it to the local mosque, temple or church.
Okay to close out today’s lesson we’d like for you to practice what you’ve just learned. I’ll provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you’re responsible for saying the Indonesian phrase out loud or in Indonesian, dengan keras. You’ll have a few seconds before I give you the answer so selamat sukses, that means "good luck!" in Indonesian.
All right so here we go!
“Excuse me”. (permisi. per-mi-si. permisi.)
“This please.” (Boleh minta ini? Bo-leh min-ta i-ni? Boleh minta ini?)
"What's the most delicious thing?" (Yang mana yang paling enak? Yang ma-na yang pa-ling e-nak? Yang mana yang paling enak?)
"May I ask for some drinking water?" (Boleh minta air minum? Bo-leh min-ta a-ir mi-num? Boleh minta air minum? )
"No ice please." (Jangan pakai es! Ja-ngan pa-kai es! Jangan pakai es!)
Alright, that's going to do it for today!
Remember to stop by IndonesianPod101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. When you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment.

11 Comments

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IndonesianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi listeners, have you tried any Indonesian dishes? what do you think of it? and what's your favorite dish?

IndonesianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 11:35 AM
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Hi Sunny,


happy new year!

very good observation!

the reason why 'pakai' sounds like /e/ is because people speaks it quickly.

The [ai] in selesai, mulai, dan memakai can also be pronounced like /e/ when pronounced quickly.

They are all the same :wink:


let us know if you still have doubts!


best,

Dipta

Team IndonesianPod101.com

Sunny
Tuesday at 01:26 PM
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[ai] pronounce of pakai is [e] of /bed/

[ai] of selesai, mulai, and memakai sounds differently.

It pronounces like [eye]

Is that right?

Let me know some examples of [ai] pronounce like 'pakai.'

IndonesianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 01:09 PM
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Hi Sunny!


that's great, yes, 'tanpa es' is a very natural way to say 'jangan pakai es' too!

Yes, Padang is a city in Sumatra Island.

Rendang padang is indeed very delicious! :sunglasses:


best

Dipta

team IndonesianPod101.com

Sunny
Sunday at 12:47 PM
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Instead of 'jangan pakai es', shortly 'tanpa es' can be used?

I'd like to try rendang Padang which is one of masakan Padang.

Padang means the area or city of Indonesia, right?

IndonesianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 07:05 PM
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Hello Jorge Pezantes


Thank you for the question.

Yes, you are right that both of them mean 'to use'.

The difference is just that 'pakai' is less formal than 'menggunakan'.

But if you add prefix 'me-', it becomes the same: 'memakai' and 'menggunakan' can be used interchangeably, because they have same level of formality.


Let us know if you have more question!

Dipta

Team IndonesianPod101.com

Jorge Pezantes
Monday at 05:47 AM
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Hello! What is the difference between "pakai" and "menggunakan"? Both verbs mean the same: "to use".

IndonesianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 01:53 PM
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Hi Alzira!


Yes, "Paling enak yang mana?" is totally fine, the meaning is the same.

The word "jangan" literally means "don't". When we say "Jangan pakai es", it literally means "Please do not use ice"

Yes you are correct, using "tidak" is also fine. "Tidak pakai es."

:wink:


Dipta

Team IndonesianPod101.com

Alzira
Wednesday at 07:38 PM
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Hello!


Can we say just "paling enak yang mana?" will that have the same meaning?


and why the word "jangan" is used? I thought it is like "stop" = stop putting ice. Is it fine to use tidak instead?

IndonesianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 10:56 AM
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Hello Kevin,


I am really sorry about it :oops:

The Lesson Notes PDF is correct now :grin: Thank you so much for spotting it!


If you have any questions, let us know!

Paloma

Team IndonesianPod101.com

Kevin
Thursday at 12:05 AM
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Hello. For PDF. Indonesian had 5 sentences but English only 4. There's one missing. Please help check.