Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Becky: Hi everyone! Welcome back to IndonesianPod101.com. This is Lower Beginner Season 1 Lesson 22, Do Indonesian People Usually Say "Good Morning" at Night? Becky here!
Fira: Halo. I'm Fira.
Becky: In this lesson, you will learn to how to express doubt in Indonesian.
Becky: The conversation takes place at a cafe.
Fira: It’s between Made and Maya.
Becky: The speakers are friends, so they’ll be using informal Indonesian.Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Maya: Oke, saya sudah tinggal di sini selama tiga tahun, dan saya masih tidak yakin kapan harus mulai mengucapkan "selamat sore" daripada "selamat siang."
Made: Saya rasa sekitar jam 4 (empat.)
Maya: Itu yang aku duga! Namun, kemarin, saya bertemu dengan wanita yang aneh. Dia bilang "Selamat pagi" kepada saya.
Made: Kapan?
Maya: Waktu itu jam setengah tujuh malam.
Made: Mungkin dia vampir.
Becky: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Maya: Oke, saya sudah tinggal di sini selama tiga tahun, dan saya masih tidak yakin kapan harus mulai mengucapkan "selamat sore" daripada "selamat siang."
Made: Saya rasa sekitar jam 4 (empat.)
Maya: Itu yang aku duga! Namun, kemarin, saya bertemu dengan wanita yang aneh. Dia bilang "Selamat pagi" kepada saya.
Made: Kapan?
Maya: Waktu itu jam setengah tujuh malam.
Made: Mungkin dia vampir.
Becky: Listen to the conversation with English translation
Maya: Oke, saya sudah tinggal di sini selama tiga tahun, dan saya masih tidak yakin kapan harus mulai mengucapkan "selamat sore" daripada "selamat siang."
Maya: Okay, I've lived here for three years, and I'm still not sure when to start saying, "good afternoon" instead of "good day."
Made: Saya rasa sekitar jam 4 (empat.)
Made: I think around 4.00 p.m.
Maya: Itu yang aku duga! Namun, kemarin, saya bertemu dengan wanita yang aneh. Dia bilang "Selamat pagi" kepada saya.
Maya: That's what I thought! And yet, yesterday, I met this strange woman. She said "Good morning" to me.
Made: Kapan?
Made: When?
Maya: Waktu itu jam setengah tujuh malam.
Maya: It was about 7.30.
Made: Mungkin dia vampir.
Made: Maybe she was a vampire.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Becky: How much do Indonesian people believe in the supernatural, Fira?
Fira: Well, in Indonesian communities, there are many mythological creatures that have usually been introduced through word-of-mouth. Almost all the different tribes and regions in Indonesia have their own mythological creatures.
Becky: Can you tell us about some of them?
Fira: Some of the famous mythological creatures include Orang Bunian and Pelesit from Sumatera, Barong and Leak from Bali, and Ebu Gogo from Nusa Tenggara.
Becky Are there some in Java too?
Fira: Yes! In Java, there is the queen of southern sea who is named Nyi Roro Kidul. Nyi Roro Kidul is a legendary figure in Indonesian folklore, and everyone from Java is familiar with her.
Becky: People believe that she’s the ruling queen of the Indian Ocean. It is said that anyone who wears her favorite color, green, in her territory along the coast of the Indian Ocean will be dragged into a palace at the bottom of the ocean to be her servant.
Fira: Yes, that’s right. If you know a Javanese person, ask them about it.
Becky: This legend is very famous, so almost every inn and hotel located along the southern coast of Java and Bali have an empty room that is decorated especially for the queen.
VOCAB LIST
Becky: Let’s look at the vocab and phrases used in this lesson. The first word is..
Fira: tinggal [natural native speed]
Becky: to stay, to live
Fira: tinggal [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Fira: tinggal [natural native speed]
Next we have..
Fira: selama [natural native speed]
Becky: during
Fira: selama [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Fira: selama [natural native speed]
Next we have..
Fira: duga [natural native speed]
Becky: to suspect, to guess, to have thought
Fira: duga [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Fira: duga [natural native speed]
Next..
Fira: aneh [natural native speed]
Becky: to be strange
Fira: aneh [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Fira: aneh [natural native speed]
Next
Fira: waktu [natural native speed]
Becky: time
Fira: waktu [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Fira: waktu [natural native speed]
Next
Fira: mungkin [natural native speed]
Becky: perhaps, maybe
Fira: mungkin [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Fira: mungkin [natural native speed]
Next
Fira: sekitar [natural native speed]
Becky: around, surrounding
Fira: sekitar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Fira: sekitar [natural native speed]
Last we have..
Fira: yakin [natural native speed]
Becky: sure
Fira: yakin [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Fira: yakin [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Becky: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. First up is...
Fira: mengucapkan
Becky: Which means "to say,” or “to utter". Can you break this word down, Fira?
Fira: Sure. It is made up of the prefix meng- which comes from the me- group, the root word ucap, which is the verb meaning "to say," and the suffix -kan.
Becky: You can use this verb only in formal situations. Usually, it’s used for greetings and when you’re congratulating someone. Can you give us an example using this word, Fira?
Fira: Saya ingin mengucapkan selamat.
Becky: Which means "I'd like to say congratulations." And listeners, note that you cannot use it in informal situations.
Fira: In informal or less formal situations, you can simply use the word bilang.
Becky: Okay, next we have..
Fira: bertemu
Becky: Which means "to meet"
Fira: This word is made up of the prefix ber-, and the root word temu meaning "to meet."
Becky: Can you give us an example?
Fira: Saya akan bertemu dengan klien saya jam 2.
Becky: Which means. "I will meet my client at 2 o'clock.” Note that you can use this word only in formal situations.
Fira: For informal situations, we say ketemu instead. As you can see, the ke- prefix is used instead of ber-, but the root word is the same.
Becky: Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Becky: In this lesson, you'll learn how to express doubt in Indonesian. We have two expressions that you can use to do this. What’s the first one, Fira?
Fira: You can use Saya rasa... when you’re asserting an opinion.
Becky: Can you break this down?
Fira: Sure! Saya means "I," and rasa is a verb meaning "to feel" or "to sense." Altogether, this means something like "I feel that…," "I think that…," "My feeling says that..." or "My opinion is..."
Becky: When you want to share your opinion about something that you have not done, are not sure about, or don’t know about, you can use this form to begin your sentence. Can you give us an example?
Fira: Sure. You can say.. Saya rasa dia akan hadir.
Becky: “I think that he will attend.”
Fira: And when you want to make a statement that contradicts something that has been said previously, you can use the word namun, which means “but” or “however.”
Becky: We also have some useful phrases that you can use for giving your opinion. We’ll go over those one by one now. Fira will say the Indonesian, then I’ll say the English translation. First we have..
Fira: saya ragu…
Becky: Which means “I doubt..”
Fira: next we have.. saya tidak yakin...
Becky: I'm not sure…
Fira: With that word, you can make a sentence like this one - Saya tidak yakin akan perkataannya.
Becky: It means “I'm not sure of what he said.” or this also can mean something like “I cannot fully trust his words”.
Fira: You can also add the word masih which means “still” to this phrase. For example, you can say.. Saya masih tidak yakin akan perkataannya.
Becky: meaning “I'm still not sure of what he said.”
Fira: You can express stronger doubt by saying saya tidak pikir bahwa..
Becky: which means “I don’t think that..”
Fira: Or tidak benar bahwa…
Becky: meaning “it's not true that…”

Outro

Becky: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time!
Fira: Sampai jumpa lagi!

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