Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Becky: Hi everyone! Welcome to IndonesianPod101.com. This is Lower Beginner Season 1, Lesson 2: Respect Your Indonesian Teacher!. I’m Becky!
Fira: Halo. I'm Fira.
Becky: Fira, what are we going to learn in this lesson?
Fira: In this lesson, we’ll learn to how to express ownership in Indonesian using the verb “to have.”
Becky: The conversation takes place in the staff room of a school.
Fira: The conversation is between Lisa and Surya.
Becky: Since the speakers are work colleagues, they’ll be speaking formal Indonesian. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Lisa: Murid-murid saya tidak memahami saya.
Surya: Masa?
Lisa: Saya punya tanggung jawab yang besar. Murid-murid itu sangat pintar.
Surya: Jangan khawatir, kamu punya banyak waktu. Mereka akan belajar.
Becky: Let’s listen again to the conversation slowly.
Lisa: Murid-murid saya tidak memahami saya.
Surya: Masa?
Lisa: Saya punya tanggung jawab yang besar. Murid-murid itu sangat pintar.
Surya: Jangan khawatir, kamu punya banyak waktu. Mereka akan belajar.
Becky: Now, let’s listen to the English translation.
Lisa: Murid-murid saya tidak memahami saya.
Lisa: My students don't understand me.
Surya: Masa?
Surya: Really?
Lisa: Saya punya tanggung jawab yang besar. Murid-murid itu sangat pintar.
Lisa: I have a big responsibility. Those students are smart.
Surya: Jangan khawatir, kamu punya banyak waktu. Mereka akan belajar.
Surya: Don't worry, you have a lot of time. They’ll learn.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Becky: Wow, it seems that Lisa takes her job as a teacher very seriously.
Fira: Of course, being a teacher in Indonesia is an important profession. It commands a lot of respect.
Becky: Why?
Fira: In Indonesia, teachers have a high social status. They’re considered to be parents outside of the home. The relationship between teachers and the students is usually close but it is a hierarchy, and students have to demonstrate respect towards their teachers.
Becky: How do they do that?
Fira: When teachers enter or leave the classroom, the students must stand and greet the teacher with, "Good morning," or "Good afternoon, ma'am or sir."
Becky: Are there a lot of rules in the classroom?
Fira: Well, teachers in Indonesia tend to be very strict. They don’t hesitate to punish students who are disobedient. For example, if students forget to do their homework, forget to bring their textbooks, or talk in the classroom, they’ll be punished by the teacher. Also, students are not allowed to color their hair or wear nail polish.
Becky: Wow, that sounds pretty strict.
Fira: It makes students fearful of making a mistake or acting inappropriately. But it keeps good order in the schools and ensures that the students respect the teacher.
Becky: Okay, now onto the vocabulary.
VOCABULARY
Becky: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word is...
Fira: ...pintar. [natural native speed]
Becky: “Smart.”
Fira: Pintar. [slowly - broken down by syllable] Pintar. [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Fira: ...khawatir. [natural native speed]
Becky: “To worry.”
Fira: Khawatir. [slowly - broken down by syllable] Khawatir. [natural native speed]
Becky: Our next word is...
Fira: ...belajar. [natural native speed]
Becky: “To study.”
Fira: Belajar. [slowly - broken down by syllable] Belajar. [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have...
Fira: ...murid. [natural native speed]
Becky: “Student.”
Fira: Murid. [slowly - broken down by syllable] Murid. [natural native speed]
Becky: The next word is...
Fira: ...besar. [natural native speed]
Becky: “Big.”
Fira: Besar. [slowly - broken down by syllable] Besar. [natural native speed]
Becky: Next...
Fira: ...waktu. [natural native speed]
Becky: “Time.”
Fira: Waktu. [slowly - broken down by syllable] Waktu. [natural native speed]
Becky: Our next word is...
Fira: ...masa. [natural native speed]
Becky: “Really?” It’s a word that expresses distrust, questioning what the speaker said.
Fira: Masa. [slowly - broken down by syllable] Masa. [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have...
Fira: ...mereka. [natural native speed]
Becky: “They” or “them.”
Fira: Mereka. [slowly - broken down by syllable] Mereka. [natural native speed]
Becky: Our final word is...
Fira: ...punya. [natural native speed]
Becky: “To have.”
Fira: Punya. [slowly - broken down by syllable] Punya. [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Becky: Let's have a closer look at some of the key words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Fira: ...tanggung jawab.
Becky: It’s a noun that means "responsibility."
Fira: That’s right. The first word tanggung is a verb meaning "to bear," and the word jawab is a verb meaning "to respond." Together, they create the noun.
Becky: How do we use this to say, “I’m responsible?”
Fira: If you want to use this as a verb, you need to add the prefix ber-. It becomes bertanggung jawab "to be responsible". This also means "to take responsibility." For example, saya bertanggung jawab.
Becky: Meaning, "I'm responsible." Can you give us another example in a sentence?
Fira: Sure! Kamu harus bertanggung jawab atas kesalahan kamu.
Becky: "You should take responsibility for your own mistake." Okay, next we have...
Fira: Memahami.
Becky: Meaning "to understand."
Fira: Memahami consists of the prefix me-, the root word paham meaning "to understand," and the suffix -i.
Becky: When can we use this verb?
Fira: This is used in a formal situation, such as if you’re talking to your boss. You can’t use this in a casual situation. In a casual conversation, use mengerti or simply just its root word ngerti. Both mean "to understand."
Becky: Can you give us an example?
Fira: Sure! Dia sudah memahami cerita itu.
Becky: "He understood that story." Okay, now let’s turn to the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Becky: In this lesson, you'll learn about how to express ownership in Indonesian using the verb “to have.”
Fira: In the dialogue, Lisa said, Saya punya tanggung jawab yang besar. Murid-murid itu sangat pintar.
Becky: Meaning, “I have a big responsibility. Those students are smart.” Lisa was taking ownership of her responsibility to teach her students well. And the Indonesian word for “to have” is...
Fira: Punya. It can mean “to own” or “to possess” as well.
Becky: Can you give us an example in a sentence?
Fira: Of course. Mereka punya sebuah vila di Bali.
Becky: "They have a villa in Bali."
Fira: Here’s another one. Dia punya kebiasaan buruk.
Becky: "He has a bad habit." Is this the only use of punya?
Fira: Well, the English verb "to have" has many uses, some of which don’t apply to the verb punya. For example, it can’t be used as a helping verb, to say “I have done this,” or “I have gone there.” Punya only indicates possession.
Becky: Got it. Let’s review this verb with the pronouns we learned in the previous lesson. Fira will give you the phrase in Indonesian, and I’ll give you the English translation.
Fira: Saya punya.
Becky: “I have.”
Fira: Kamu punya.
Becky: “You have.”
Fira: Dia punya.
Becky: “He has,” or “she has.” Remember that the third person singular doesn’t distinguish between male and female.
Fira: Kami punya.
Becky: “We have.”
Fira: Kalian punya.
Becky: “You have,” with a plural “you.”
Fira: Mereka punya.
Becky: “They have.”
Fira: You can also create a possessive pronoun using the word punya.
Becky: How so?
Fira: You combine the word punya with a pronoun. For example, punya saya means “mine.”
Becky: Let’s hear some sample sentences.
Fira: Ini punya saya.
Becky: "This is mine."
Fira: Ini punya dia.
Becky: "This is his/hers."
Fira: Ini punya kamu.
Becky: "This is yours."
Fira: Ini punya kami.
Becky: "This is ours."
Fira: Ini punya mereka.
Becky: "This is theirs."
Becky: Well, that should be easy to remember!
MARKETING PIECE
Fira: Listeners, do you understand Indonesian TV shows, movies or songs?
Becky: How about your friends and loved ones’ conversations in Indonesian?
Fira: If you want to know what’s going on, we have a tool to help.
Becky: Line-by-line audio.
Fira: Listen to the lesson conversations line-by-line, and learn to understand natural Indonesian fast!
Becky: It’s simple really.
Fira: With the click of a button, listen to each line of the conversation.
Becky: Listen again and again, and tune your ear to natural Indonesian.
Fira: Rapidly understand natural Indonesian with this powerful tool.
Becky: You can find this feature on the lesson page in the Lesson Materials section at IndonesianPod101.com.

Outro

Becky: Thanks for listening, everyone. See you next time!
Fira: Sampai jumpa lagi!

7 Comments

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IndonesianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Who's your best teacher?

IndonesianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 03:24 PM
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Hi Sokhann,


You have used the word “punya” correctly, as described in this lesson.

“... kamu tidak punya waktu untuk berbicara dengan saya.” means you have no time to talk to me. Good job!


As for the first half of the sentence, it should sound like this: “Kamu sangat sibuk bekerja sehingga...”


Besides using “punya, you also used a structure that is not discussed in this lesson: so... that.


so... that — sangat... sehingga

“Kamu sangat sibuk bekerja sehingga kamu tidak punya waktu untuk berbicara dengan saya.”


Salam,

Sarah

Team IndonesianPod101.com


Sokhann C.
Thursday at 01:50 PM
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Hi

How would you say this...

"You been so busy working that you have no time to talk to me."


"Kamu sedang kerjaan sekali yang tidak punya waktu berbicara dengan saya."


Boleh tolong... ( not even sure I said that right) terimakasih banyak

IndonesianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 02:48 PM
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Hi Ross,


thank you for posting!

Yes, that is one important difference between English and Indonesian.

In English, modifier (adverb, adjective, etc) comes before the noun.

e.g:

"My students". "My" is the modifier, and "students" is the noun.

"Good teacher". "Good" is the modifier, and "teacher" is the noun.

"One apple". "One" is the modifier, and "apple" is the noun.


In Indonesian, it is the opposite, except for number.

e.g:

"Murid saya". "Murid" is the noun, "saya" is the modifier.

"Guru baik". "Guru" is the noun, "baik" is the modifier.

"Satu apel". (this is the exception) "Satu" is the modifier, and "apel" is the noun.


Let us know if you have any more question.


Dipta

Team IndonesianPod101.com

Ross
Tuesday at 04:55 AM
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I am having difficulty with this because you have to listen to some parts back to front.


Example

Murid-murid saya tidak memahami saya.

Students My No Understand Me


Its like decoding English haha :)

IndonesianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 02:40 PM
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Hi Adil,


Thanks for asking.

They are the same, you can use them interchangeably.

However, the nuance of "memiliki" is more formal.


Let us know if you have any more question. :wink:


Dipta

Team IndonesianPod101.com

adil
Monday at 08:31 PM
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what is the difference in punya (have) and memiliki (have)?:sunglasses: