Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Damon: Hi everyone, this is Damon. Welcome back to IndonesianPod101.com. This is Beginner Season 1, Lesson 6 – Which Indonesian Food Should We Eat For Lunch Today?
Fira: Hello! I’m Fira.
Damon: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to express preferences.
Fira: The conversation is between Andi and Lisa, at the office.
Damon: They are trying to decide where to go for lunch.
Fira: As they’re good friends, they’ll be using informal Indonesian.
DIALOGUE
ANDI: Kamu tahu tidak ada gerai makanan di seberang kantor?
LISA: Hanya lihat sekilas, mereka jual masakan apa?
ANDI: Banyak. Ada bubur Manado, Gudeg Jogja, juga rendang padang. Semuanya lezat!
LISA: Aku lebih suka Masakan Padang, apalagi rendang pedas.
ANDI: Bagaimana kalau kita mampir ke sana untuk makan siang.
LISA: Boleh, aku menyelesaikan pekerjaan dan merapikan mejaku dulu ya.
ANDI: Baik, aku juga harus mengerjakan beberapa hal.
Damon: Now, let's hear it with the English translation.
ANDI: Kamu tahu tidak ada gerai makanan di seberang kantor?
DAMON: Did you notice the new food court across from our office?
LISA: Hanya lihat sekilas, mereka jual masakan apa?
DAMON: Just caught a glance, what do they serve?
ANDI: Banyak. Ada bubur Manado, Gudeg Jogja, juga rendang padang. Semuanya lezat!
DAMON: A lot. You can find Manado porridge, Jogja Gudeg, and also I hear one Padang restaurant offers very delicious rendang.
LISA: Aku lebih suka Masakan Padang, apalagi rendang pedas.
DAMON: I would prefer the Padang restaurant, I always love spicy rendang.
ANDI: Bagaimana kalau kita mampir ke sana untuk makan siang.
DAMON: How about we drop by there for lunch.
LISA: Boleh, aku menyelesaikan pekerjaan dan merapikan mejaku dulu ya.
DAMON: I'd love to, I'll finish my task here and clean up my desk.
ANDI: Baik, aku juga harus mengerjakan beberapa hal.
DAMON: Okay, I also have some stuff to do.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Damon: Listeners, do you still remember the Indonesian traditional dish we talked about in an earlier lesson?
Fira: It was sop buntut, or “oxtail soup”. And now we’re going to share with you another delicious food of Indonesia; rendang.
Damon: Yes, apparently rendang is one of the most famous Indonesian foods that is also popular in Malaysia and Singapore, and around the world! As the indigenous people of West Sumatra and Padang have traveled and moved abroad, they’ve introduced this cuisine to the places they’ve gone.
Fira: And what makes it so popular is the authentic taste. It’s rich in spices, and the tender meat marinated in coconut milk will make you a rendang addict!
Damon: I’m already hooked! Also, according to original recipes, it can last for a whole week after preparation. What makes this food stay fresh for so long?
Fira: Good question! The recipes of the Padang people include ingredients like ginger, galangal, and turmeric, which have antimicrobial properties that keep the food from spoiling quickly.
Damon: Also the meat is cooked so slowly that it becomes very tender and absorbs all of the spices till it’s perfectly dry. This process also helps rendang last longer. Mmm, I can’t wait to try this when I go to Indonesia.
VOCAB LIST
Damon: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is...
Fira: sekilas [natural native speed]
Damon: to glimpse, to glance
Fira: sekilas [slowly - broken down by syllable] sekilas [natural native speed]
Damon: Next
Fira: seberang [natural native speed]
Damon: across
Fira: seberang [slowly - broken down by syllable] seberang [natural native speed]
Damon: Next
Fira: lezat [natural native speed]
Damon: delicious
Fira: lezat [slowly - broken down by syllable] lezat [natural native speed]
Damon: Next
Fira: dengar [natural native speed]
Damon: to hear
Fira: dengar [slowly - broken down by syllable] dengar [natural native speed]
Damon: Next
Fira: pedas [natural native speed]
Damon: spicy
Fira: pedas [slowly - broken down by syllable] pedas [natural native speed]
Damon: Next
Fira: selesaikan [natural native speed]
Damon: to finish
Fira: selesaikan [slowly - broken down by syllable] selesaikan [natural native speed]
Damon: Next
Fira: pekerjaan [natural native speed]
Damon: task
Fira: pekerjaan [slowly - broken down by syllable] pekerjaan [natural native speed]
Damon: And last...
Fira: banyak [natural native speed]
Damon: many
Fira: banyak [slowly - broken down by syllable] banyak [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Damon: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. First, let’s talk about the word for “delicious”.
Fira: Sure. Andi says, Rendang yang sangat lezat. The word lezat is the adjective that can be translated as “delicious”.
Damon: But there are so many other ways you can say “delicious”, aren’t there?
Fira: Yes! You can use words such as sedap, gurih, and enak, which all describe food that tastes really nice. Also, do you remember when Lisa says Rendang pedas?
Damon: Yeah. Is that also a comment on how great the food is?
Fira: No, pedas is actually used to describe the taste of food that comes from chili and pepper.
Damon: So it means “spicy”?
Fira: Yes, that’s right. Other descriptive words are manis, which is the taste of sugar…
Damon: …“sweet”...
Fira: ...asin, the taste from salt…
Damon: …“salty”...
Fira: ...and asam, the taste from tamarind and kaffir lime.
Damon: ...which is “sour”. Not only is Indonesian food rich in spices, but it’s also extremely diverse in taste!
Fira: That’s right, Damon. You must try the wonderful culinary delights of Indonesia!
Damon: So, now we know how to talk about taste in Indonesian! Now onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Damon: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to describe a preference. How do we do this in Indonesian, Fira?
Fira: The principle is the same as in English. The pattern for describing a preference is [subject plus lebih suka plus the first object plus daripada then the second object.
Damon: This formula can be translated as “subject would rather object 1 than object 2” or “subject would prefer object 1 to object 2.” I think preference in Indonesian is simpler than it is in English. Can we hear some example sentences?
Fira: Definitely! Andi lebih suka berenang daripada berlari.
Damon: “Andi prefers swimming to running.”
Fira: Ayah lebih suka tinggal di desa daripada tinggal di kota.
Damon: “Father would prefer to live in the country than to live in the city.” Great! How about the interrogative forms to ask someone’s preference, Fira?
Fira: Well, that’s very simple too. You can simply ask, Yang mana yang kamu suka?
Damon: “Which would you prefer?”
Fira: Or you can ask by giving options…
Damon: …as in “would you prefer A or B?”
Fira: Exactly. Just memorize this formula: [subject plus lebih suka plus the first clause or object plus atau plus the second clause or object.]
Damon: Ok, some more examples please!
Fira: For example, Ibu lebih suka makan nasi atau makan kentang?
Damon: “Would mother prefer to eat rice or to eat potato?” Ok! I think that’s pretty clear.
MARKETING PIECE
Fira: Listeners, ever have any Indonesian language or lesson-related questions?
Damon: Or maybe you have some feedback for us...
Fira: Leave us a comment or ask a question on the lessons page!
Damon: It's super simple. Go to IndonesianPod101.com ...
Fira: ...click on comments,
Damon: ...enter your comment and name,
Fira: ...and that's it!
Damon: Commenting is a a great way to practice writing and reading in Indonesian.
Fira: It helps you learn faster.
Damon: And it helps us get better through your feedback.
Fira: No excuses.
Damon: Go to IndonesianPod101.com , and comment now.
Fira: NOW!

Outro

Damon: Okay, that’s all for this lesson.
Fira: We hope you enjoyed our lesson!
Damon: Keep practising and check the lesson notes for more information on what we’ve just learned. We’ll be waiting for you in the next lesson. Bye!
Fira: Sampai jumpa lagi!

13 Comments

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IndonesianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Let's try to describe your favorite Indonesian dish here!

 

IndonesianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 09:49 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Christie,


Yes, they are different words. seberang is a noun and seberangi is a verb. The latter has an addition of affix -i so we know it is a verb. Therefore, the meaning and usage of the two are also different.


I hope this helps,

Sarah

Team IndonesianPod101.con

Christie
Monday at 01:12 PM
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Hi, I've read from another lesson about seberangi.

Can you explain what's the difference with seberang and seberangi?

IndonesianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 07:38 PM
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Hey Jack,


Thank you for your question. The "10$ per month, 240$ a year" is in fact "10$ per month, 240$ 2-year," so that's a 2-year subscription. All subscriptions are to be paid in full. If you prefer the monthly subscriptions, those are also available: $25 for Premium, $8 for Basic and $47 for Premium PLUS. For a comprehensive overview of our different subscription options, please have a look at https://www.indonesianpod101.com/helpcenter/billingsubscription/pricing.


Hope this helps. Good luck!


Levente

Team IndonesianPod101.com

Jack
Thursday at 10:44 AM
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I want to pay for every month not for a year, but when I registered to pay, I see "10$ per month, 240 $ a year". Do I pay 10 $ or 240$."

colin
Sunday at 02:02 PM
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Does 'gerai makanan' really mean ' new food court'? I think they speak about food stalls, probably kaki lima.They are not restaurants, altho there is often a bench seat to sit on, sometimes some tables and chairs in a small tented enclosure.



IndonesianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 05:33 PM
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Hi John,


"Kamu tahu tidak ada gerai makanan di seberang kantor?" literally translates as "Did you know or did you not know that there is a new food court across from our office?


"Kamu tahu tidak?" is shortened from "Kamu tahu atau tidak?" meaning "Do you know or not". Now, I hardly hear people say "Kamu tahu atau tidak?".


Hope this helps,

Sarah

Team IndonesianPod101.com

John Holstein
Tuesday at 09:23 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

In the dialog there is a confusing translation, with the use of 'tidak':


"Kamu tahu tidak ada gerai makanan di seberang kantor? "

"Did you notice the new food court across from our office?"

I would translate it as "Did you know that there is no food court across from our office"?


Kindly explain. Thanks!

IndonesianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 03:11 PM
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Hi David!


Thank you for asking. "hal" is roughly translated as "thing". However, it refers to intangible or abstract things, instead of physical objects.

Example: "Sir, can you explain about this thing?" - "Pak, bisakah anda menjelaskan tentang hal ini?"


Hope that helps!

Let us know if you still have question.


cheers,

Dipta

Team IndonesianPod101.com

David Ng
Monday at 10:12 AM
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Hi My friend ,

How can use word " Hal"

Thank you very much !

David Ng

IndonesianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 04:34 PM
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Hello Scott,


Thank you for posting. The typo is fixed.

We only pick 8-10 vocabulary and introduce them in the vocabulary list.

For more vocab, please check our Indonesian Dictionary: https://www.indonesianpod101.com/indonesian-dictionary/


Let us know if you have any further questions.

Sincerely,

Lena

Team IndonesianPod101.com